Envionmental Psychology

Shape Your Environment for Happiness!

 

Plan an Extraordinary Spring Garden

By Jeanette Joy Fisher

Waterwise Xeriscaping

Now that spring is officially (on the calendar, at least), it's time to think about how to turn your garden from ordinary to extraordinary.

One way to do that is to think in terms of xeriscaping. The term means to use waterwise  plants, which is especially useful in dry climates. Xeric species make gardening easier because they're drought resistant, and friendlier to the environment, because they use less water to provide lushness in both flowers and foliage. Most xeric plants are also perennials, so they will continue to flourish for years without having to be replanted every spring.

There are many types of gardens that can also create spectacular effects. For instance, formal gardens are meant to convey a sense of power over the environment through the use of carefully trimmed hedges and symmetrical layouts. This type of garden was especially popular during Elizabethan times. They require considerably more work, but the overall effort can be very dramatic.

A woodland garden can also be beautiful, using a combination of plants that can tolerate shade and partial sunlight. The idea is to mimic the randomness of the forest floor, and augment that with the use of stone and wood to create a warm and inviting feeling. Water elements are often used, as well as stone bridges and walkways. The idea is to work with the space and make it feel as if everything belongs there within a naturalistic setting.

If your space is truly limited, you can still create spectacular effects by creating a container garden. These are particularly effective in an urban setting, especially in a courtyard or on a patio. By using varying sizes and shapes of containers and mixing various textures and colors together, you can create stunning effects without having to have a large amount of space.

Another garden that can create a wonderfully organic effect is the wildflower garden. As the name suggests, the aim is to recreate the randomness you'd find in an open meadow. The overall effect can be quite breathtaking, and sowing the seeds can be as simple as just sprinkling handfuls of wildflower seeds around your garden area. A pleasant bonus to this type of garden is that it will attract lots of birds and butterflies, as well, which will provide even more enjoyment for nature lovers.

You don't have to spend huge amounts of money to create extraordinary garden spaces. It just requires thought and imagination.

Copyright 2006 Jeanette J. Fisher

Bird Watching

5.  Environmental Psychology: Your Responsibility to the Universe

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